If you see any signs of Raccoon activity around your home – call us for a ‘Predator Scent Application’ it’s a safe, non-invasive way to deter Raccoons from nesting in and around your home!

SURREY RACCOON

picture by: Craig Perell

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Raccoon Roof Damage

Our little furry nocturnal friends are starting to breed now, and they are looking for a nice safe spot to have their babies. This spot might just be your attic! or shed, maybe under the porch or in the crawl space. As cute as they are, they can cause some serious damage to your roof, insulation, siding, drywall or electrical. Their mating season has started and will last until May or June, after a 9 week gestation period a mother Raccoon, on average will have 3 or 4 Kits, but can have as many as 6 or 7!. The newborns will remain in thier den for a few weeks befor mom will let them venture out. Baby raccoons may sound like ‘chirping birds’ or even like a human baby when they are distressed. Mother will have a few den sites in mind in your area, so if you’re lucky enough and can cause her enough unrest about the spot in your attic she has chosen, she will move on to another site before she gives birth. Raccoons can carry a host of diseases and parasites and can attack your pets. When the raccoon is a new mom her senses are extremely hightened and they become very unpredictable and sometimes hard to remove.

An ounce of prevention – do all you can to make sure your home is not an attractive place for wildlife;

Do not leave any standing water outside

Bring pet food/water indoors at night

Put farm feed, grass seed etc in containers with tight fitting lids

Put garbage in a container with a tight fitting lid or lock

Harvest gardens regularly and remove any fallen fruit from fruit trees

Trim tree branches away from home (roof and eaves), at least 8 – 10 feet

It is not advised to have climbing plants against your home, but if you do, keep them trimmed and far away from the roof area

Keep shrubs and bushes trimmed and away from the foundation

If you have chickens, proof their pens against night visitors

Have an inspection done by a professional pest control technician to advise you of areas that could be entry points for any wildlife and address these problems as soon as possible – this can save you a lot of money and sleepless nights!

Call the Experts 602-589-3338

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SLPD - BLOG - RAT

Just one?

Think again! rodents reproduce quickly…best to call when any signs or noises are heard!

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FREE INSPECTION

December Special!

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DISPLAYED SMITHSONIAN MUSEUMBED BUGS

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Rachel Kaufman for National Geographic News

Published June 1, 2011

A skunk’s stripes aren’t just for style: They may direct predators’ eyes straight to the source of the animal’s smelly anal spray.

A new analysis of data on and pictures of nearly 200 carnivorous mammals—including skunks, badgers, and wolverines—shows that fierce fighters tend to be more boldly colored than more peaceable animals, which tend to use camouflage to stay safe.

And those colorations depend on the animals’ methods of defense.

Creatures such as skunks, which have long stripes down their body, “tend to be really good at spraying their anal gland secretions—not just dribbling them out,” said study leader Ted Stankowich, a biologist at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Skunks are known to eject their offensive musk as far as about ten feet (three meters).

Other “species that are pretty good at [spraying]—they may not have pure stripes, but their blotches sort of form a stripe down the body.”

On the other end, badgers—which bite attackers—often have stripes by their mouths.

“We think these stripes may guide predators’ attention to the source of danger,” said Stankowich.

“If you’re a badger and your mouth is the source of danger, that’s what you want to advertise.”

Bold Colors an Alternative to Stinky Spray?

Warning coloration is more typically found in insects, reptiles, and amphibians, such as poison dart frogs.

This nonconfrontational technique for thwarting predators is especially useful for skunks, which prefer not having to spray.

Spraying is “costly … they’re depleting a weapon, using ammunition that might be useful, and it advertises where they are,” Stankowich said.

The stripe “strategy” has been a successful one for skunks throughout evolutionary time, Stankowich said, as the same striped pattern has independently evolved multiple times in skunks and related species across the globe.

The zorilla, for example, can spray like a skunk but lives in Africa and is more closely related to weasels than skunks. Yet its fur is striped just like a skunk’s, leading the researchers to conclude that the stripes are a good predator deterrent—as is, of course, the ability to spray.

Like skunks, most other mamallian predators use anal gland secretions, but generally in smaller doses, to mark territory, Stankowich noted. (Humans and primates lack anal glands.)

Skunks and other sprayers, though—finding themselves with a surplus of musk—”may have co-opted it for use as a defense.”

The mammal warning colors study was published online May 25 by the journal Evolution.

BED BUGS COME IN ALL SIZES

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LANGLEY HOME INVASION

WAR AGAINST THE SQUIRRELS…THEY MAY WIN!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEARING NOISES?

SEEING DAMAGE TO YOUR SIDING/SOFFITS?

TRIED YOURSELF, DIDN’T WORK?

TIME FOR AN EXPERT!

CALL PEST DETECTIVE, WE CAN HELP!

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RACCOONS MOVING IN?

They’re not as friendly as they look, these little nocturnal

pests will rob you of your sanity as they keep you up

at night making a home in your attic!

Call us today for humane raccoon removal or

deterrent applications.

604-589-3338